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Ajanta Caves details - Cave 18, 19

Cave 18:
PRINCESS LOOKING AT HER MIRROR:
The Ajanta masters have shown human life in all its varied colors. One of the scenes, always preferred in Indian painting, has been of sringar, showing the decoration by the women of her body. In one of the most exquisite paintings in this cave, a Princess is looking at her mirror, after she has done her srinagar. One of her female attendants holds a tray of toilet utensils. The other holds a flywhisk in her hand. A little child is looking on from below.

Cave 19:
Cave 19 is a chaitya gathering hall, with many paintings and sculptures. They are mostly disfigured.

CHAITYA HALL:
The same donor as cave 17 patronized this cave. It was scooped at the same time. It is the chaitya gathering hall for worship. The carving is intricate. The faced is elaborate, with pilasters, which were to be copied in other caves later. There are heavy bodied, strong, somewhat squat yaksha guardians, flanking the right and the left side of the main arch. The rinkles of their hair fall like fountains while they are profusely garlanded and bejeweled. On the base of the big stupa at the center of the chaitya hall are dancing dwarfs.
BUDDHA:
The solemn Buddha standing above is contrasted with the moving urchins below.
Under the arched Chaitya window are sculptured Images of the Buddha in the niches.
The forecourt has fallen.
There is a second aisle towards the nave.
The columns have square bases, round shafts, and rich bands of carvings on bracket capitals.
STANDING BUDDHA:
There is a Standing Buddha on the tall stupa. The stupa itself is crowned with an umbrella that nearly touches the roof.
NAGA KING:
There is a Naga King with his queen and attendants, which highly finishing carving.
The aboriginals and the lower caste people, who became Buddhist, brought snake worship with them. The nagas, or snakes, were given human from, except for the hood of snakeheads, which was put round their heads. There was a superstition that the worship of nagas brings rain. Even nowadays peasants consider snakes auspicious.

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